Let’s Dish 20 results
  • Let’s Dish! Let’s Talk About Tapioca

    By MaryAnn Miano Imagine eating food made from a violently poisonous plant! That is what we do every time we eat tapioca pudding. The roots of most varieties of the plant that tapioca is derived from are bitter and can contain enough cyanide to be toxic. Yet, by the time we put it into puddings, tapioca is as mild and healthful as any food. Centuries ago, the Indians of the Amazon somehow discovered the secret of this strange food. Tapioca comes from the big, juicy roots of the cassava or ...
  • Let’s Dish! Let’s Talk About Scallions

    By MaryAnn Miano   An appealing late springtime vegetable such as the scallion is easy to grow, easy to dice, and easy to use in a variety of interesting recipes and salads. The scallion, also known as “green onion or spring onion,” is a tender immature common yellow, red, or white onion that is part of the allium, or lily, family. These onions are harvested before the plant’s bulb can grow too big. The scallion is planted very close together in the field for the sole purpose ...
  • Let’s Dish! Let’s Talk About Coconut Cream Pie

    By MaryAnn Miano No one wants a pie thrown in their face, but if the pie is coconut cream, then toss away and aim straight for the mouth! Celebrate May 8, National Coconut Cream Pie month, by indulging in this yummy treat…and if there are any leftovers, forfeit them to mom for Mother’s Day on May 11. A pie short on features but rich in taste, coconut cream pie only takes a few ingredients to mix together. Center stage is the whipped cream topping, but without the distinct grated ...
  • Let’s Dish About Maple Syrup!

                    One of the most beautiful trees in our forests – the maple – stands tall, stately, and graceful, with handsome, shapely leaves.  This amazing tree not only gives us beautiful wood, but also weeps a sap so sweet and syrupy, many of us can’t imagine a pancake breakfast without it.                 The “running of the sap” is the discharge of sugary liquid from maple trees during late winter. Maple trees are tapped by boring a hole ...
  • LET’S DISH LET’S TALK ABOUT…THE WORLD’S BEST HAM!

    LET’S DISH LET’S TALK ABOUT…THE WORLD’S BEST HAM! Over 40 years ago, Harry J. Hoenselaar began a special tradition when he opened his first “The HoneyBaked Ham” company store in Michigan. He'd select the finest quality bone-in ham, cure it in his secret marinade, and then for tenderness, he'd smoke the ham for hours over a unique blend of hardwood chips. The crowning touch was Harry's crunchy sweet glaze that crackled with good taste. He even found a way to slice the ham into ...
  • LET’S DISH! LET’S TALK ABOUT LYCHEES By MaryAnn Miano

    LET’S DISH!  LET’S TALK ABOUT LYCHEES By MaryAnn Miano                 Tasting different or unusual fruits and vegetables is one of the more pleasant aspects of life. Some foods are not really so unusual, but perhaps they are not part of the culture one is raised with. It is a true taste sensation to try something you are unfamiliar with eating. If you’ve never tried a lychee nut before, you are in for a very nice surprise! Don’t worry if you are allergic to nuts, ...
  • Let’s Dish Let’s Talk About Cornish Hens!

    Let's Dish Let's Talk About Cornish Hens! When in a “fowl” mood and unable to decide between dining on the darker meat or the breast of a chicken, you can have yourself a Cornish hen and have it all! These delectable mini-chickens are truly a breed unto themselves. At  approximately one to two pounds of meat or less per hen, they are smaller than the average poultry. This tiny bird is a descendant of Corn-wall, England, but became popular in the United States in the 1950s when breeders ...
  • LET’S DISH by MaryAnn Miano

    Summertime without grilling corn on the cob is unimaginable.  Were it not for the indigenous peoples in the Americas cultivating these pearls of gold, correctly called maize, no one would have discovered corn in its present form growing in the wild.  Archaeologists who have studied corn can only find a history of cultivated grains going back in the Americas to approximately 9,000 years.  Botanists studying the ancestry of corn during the early part of the 20th century discovered that maize ...